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About Us

Welcome to NPGRC Delhi

Welcome to the National Public Grievances and Redressal Commission.

      National Public Grievances and Redressal Commission (NPGRC) is a national level registered body, which is autonomous civic organisation, envisions to uphold, protect and enforce the rights of the citizens through public grievance and redressal by offering legal advocacy ,Mediation,Re-Conciliation , Re Scheduling and Pre- Litigation , for achieving an equitable and egalitarian society.
      Our Mission is to sustain, protect and implement the social privileges of all under served communities at National & international level, and our vision is, 'freedom and justice are essential rights for every human being.'
      As a national body, the NPGRC has its National Advisory Board, State Legal Advisors for all states of India, District Legal Advisors, Retired Judges of High Courts, District & Sections Court, Seniors Lawyers, Advocates, legal experts, welfare officers, research scholars, and so on.
      Special attention and caring is given paramount importance for Child Rights & Monitoring through National Child Grievance & Redressal Committee by giving training, conducting workshops in schools and other institutions, and counselling them by addressing their various issues through trained and experienced counsellors and experts.
      The NPGRC prioritises in giving legal advocacy to the problems of ST & SC, Minorities, Women, Transgender, Senior Citizens etc. and general public.
      The NPGR Commission undertakes Public Grievances and Public Hearings, conducting Pre- Litigation's for amicably settling disputes related with personal or corporate and Banking & Financial Institutions, NPA Debt Recovery Settlements, and forward the cases and matters which are related to Government agencies like National Human Rights Commission, National Child Protection Commission, National Women's Commission, National Scheduled Caste Commission, National Scheduled Tribe Commission, and report to various Ministries to Redress the public issues. The Commission pre-eminently takes Civil & Criminal cases and offers legal support from the District level to the International Level and settles inter-state cases also.
      The NPGRC has an empaneled group of Advocates, representing rural, urban, and international level, which comprised of more than 2000 Lawyers, where the commission works with international Lawyers for any grievance related with an Indian citizen. Moreover, the organisation nominates voluntary welfare officers and monitoring committees at District, State, Division & National level for implementing the Central and state government schemes at Village & Grama Panchayat Level.
      Even though the NPGRC collaborates and cooperates with state legal service authorities, Incoming grievances / complaints are directed towards different departments under the legislation of the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi and its national body lay down by the jurisdiction of the government of India. The commission is working in accordance with all the National legal service authorities , State legal service authorities and Taluk legal service authorities to get the service to every sector of the society.
A Division of National Public Grievance & Redressal Commission
1. Auxiliary Dispute Perseverance Centre for Pre-Litigation Conciliation

Our Special Innovation Programs
1.GRIEVANCE CELL
2.CHAMBER OF SOCIAL JUSTICE & EMPOWERMENT
3.CHAMBER OF SC/ST/OBC/OEC & MINORITES
4. CHAMBER OF WOMEN & CHILD PROTECTION,GRIEVANCE REDRESSAL MONITORING CELL

       NPGRC is a legal platform comprising of many Judges serving at various levels of the judiciary, Social activists, as well as efficient and prominent Lawyers working to empower people with the power of law. The commission is also supported and guided by retired IPS officers. The Public Grievances Commission administers a comprehensive mechanism for the effective Redress of grievances received from the public. Grievance and Redressal is a management and Governance related process used commonly in India. While it primarily covers the receipt and processing of complaints from citizens and consumers, a wider view includes actions taken on any issue raised by them to avail services more effectively. The Commission is an autonomous organisation. The main aim of the commission is ‘‘spreading legal awareness among the public through various means’’.

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      Incoming grievances / complaints are directed towards different departments under the legislation of the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi and its national body lay down by the jurisdiction of the government of India. The commission is working in accordance with all the National legal service authorities , State legal service authorities and Taluk legal service authorities to get the service to every sector of the society.
The National Public Grievances and Redressal Commission (NPGRC) is an autonomous public registration body (Govt. of NCT of Delhi).

What is Grievance?

      A grievance is a complaint. It can be formal, as when an employee files a grievance because of unsafe working conditions, or more of an emotional matter, like a grievance against an old friend who betrayed you.

      A grievance is a complaint that may or may not be justified. Often a grievance is a complaint about something that breaks a rule or a law, like a grievance filed against a person who builds a fence in his front yard in a town that does not allow that. If that same neighbour plants flowers and he knows that it will make you sneeze uncontrollably, you might be unhappy about that, but this is the kind of grievance you can work out among yourself.

      The term grievance has another specific meaning related to law. A grievance in the employment context refers to a specific, formal notice of employee dissatisfaction expressed through an identified procedure. Grievance procedures typically define within how many days after the incident or situation complained of a grievance must be filed, in what form it must be filed, with whom it is filed, and define rights such as the right to a hearing, representation at such hearing, the right to a timely response, and rights to an appeal.

      Grievances are usually based upon a violation of a law, violation of a term in an employment contract, or a violation of a past practice. A past practice grievance usually arises when management unilaterally, and without notice to the union, changes an established procedure or disciplines a worker for following a past practice.

      When an employee is a member of a labour union, the procedures for filing a grievance are defined in the agreement and policies established between the union and each employer. Procedures vary by employer, but an employee grievance is typically submitted to the union representative. If the employee is unsatisfied with the response, there may be an appeals procedure, which varies by employer, according to the collective bargaining agreement.

What is Public Rights. ?

      Public rights are all those rights which belong to citizens but are vested in and vindicated by political entities. Public rights cannot be vindicated by private citizens. A right must normally be a private right to be vindicated in court. Public rights may exist at common law or under statute. For example, the right of access to information held by the government is existing at common law. Public rights may derive from the common law (such as the right of members of the public to pass and respass along the highway) or from statue. In either case, the remedy for infringement is by indictment or in a realtor’s action for an injunction.

      Public rights may also include all types of fundamental rights guaranteed by our Indian constitution from article 14 to 32. Right to equality, right to freedom , right against exploitation, right to freedom of religion , right to property, right to privacy, cultural and educational rights are some of the basic rights guaranteed.

What are Fundamental Human Rights. ?

      The Rights and Fundamental Rights are sections of the Constitution of India that provides people with their rights. These Fundamental Rights are considered as basic human rights of all citizens, irrespective of their gender, caste, religion or creed etc. These sections are the vital elements of the constitution, which was developed between 1947 and 1949 by the Constitution of India. The Fundamental Rights, embodied in Part III of the Constitution, guarantee civil rights to all Indians, and prevent the State from encroaching an individual's liberty while simultaneously placing upon it an obligation to protect the citizens' rights from encroachment by society.
There are six fundamental rights in India. They are Right to Equality, Right to Freedom, Right against Exploitation, Right to Freedom of Religion, Cultural and Educational Rights, and Right to Constitutional Remedies.

      The purpose of the Fundamental Rights is to preserve individual liberty and democratic principles based on equality of all members of society. Dr BR Ambedkar said that the responsibility of the legislature is not just to provide fundamental rights but also and rather, more importantly, to safeguard them.
They act as limitations on the powers of the legislature and executive, under Article 13, and in case of any violation of these rights the Supreme Court of India and the High Courts of the states have the power to declare such legislative or executive action as unconstitutional and void. These rights are largely enforceable against the State, which as per the wide definition provided in Article 12, includes not only the legislative and executive wings of the federal and state governments, but also local administrative authorities and other agencies and institutions which discharge public functions or are of a governmental character. However, there are certain rights – such as those in Articles 15, 17, 18, 23, 24 – that are also available against private individuals. Further, certain Fundamental Rights – including those under Articles 14, 20, 21, 25 – apply to persons of any nationality upon Indian soil, while others – such as those under Articles 15, 16, 19, 30 – are applicable only to citizens of India.

What is Human Rights. ?

      Human rights are the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world, from birth until death. They apply regardless of where you are from, what you believe or how you choose to live your life. They are inherent to all human beings, whatever the nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status is. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination.
Human rights are the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the world, from birth until death. They apply regardless of where you are from, what you believe or how you choose to live your life. They are inherent to all human beings, whatever the nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status is. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination.

      They can never be taken away, although they can sometimes be restricted– for example if a person breaks the law, or in the interests of national security.
These basic rights are based on shared values like dignity, fairness, equality, respect and independence. These values are defined and protected by law. In Britain our human rights are protected by the Human Rights Act 1998.
Human Rights protect you in many areas of your day-to-day life, including:
• your right to have and express your own opinions
• your right to an education
• your right to a private and family life
• your right not to be mistreated or wrongly punished by the state

      The idea that human beings should have a set of basic rights and freedoms has deep roots in Britain. Landmark developments in Britain include:
• the Magna Carta of 1215
• the Habeas Corpus Act of 1679
• the Bill of Rights of 1689